Proper Alzheimer’s Care

If you have a loved one that has been recently diagnosed with o e Alzheimer’s, then you undoubtedly have a million questions on your mind. One of these questions might be what kind of Alzheimer’s care is needed? Or, how can I best care for my loved one? This blog post will be focusing on just that. If you want to learn more read on.

alzheimers care

Sunlight and fresh air will be refreshing for your loved one, and will engage many of his senses, as well.

Develop a Day-to-Day Routine

One thing you should do is develop a day-to-day routine. This will make it easier for your loved one to cope with every day matters. You can do this by doing the following things: keep a sense of structure and familiarity, let your loved one know what to expect every day, and involve them in daily activities.

Communicate With Them

Another thing that you should do is communicate with them in a clear and concise manner. Doing things like keep all communication short, clear, and simple, call them by name, speak slowly, and word questions in a way that they are available to answer.

Plan Activities

Another thing that you should do is plan activities for them. Ask them about their interests and plan their activities based on those interests. Perform activities with them that use the senses such as sigh, smell, hearing, and touch. Also be sure to plan time outdoors with them. A little sunlight and fresh air will not only be refreshing but it will be good for your loved one as well.

These are just a few things you can do to help care for your loved one. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us.

Tips for Alzheimers Care

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Some days are better than others, so the more flexible and adaptable you are, the better care you will be able to offer your loved one.

Having a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease can be a difficult process, especially if you are the primary caregiver. Your loved one likely requires constant support, and having to know what to do and how can make you feel almost as confused as your loved one. But there are a few ways to improve the quality of Alzheimer’s care you provide:

Use schedules to your advantage. With careful scheduling, you can plan your loved one’s days so that they are as comfortable as possible. The more consistent a routine you can establish, the less confusion they will experience. In addition, if they have to do something complicated or deviate from the routine, schedule that during the time of day they are the most alert and agreeable.

Don’t turn the schedule into a crutch, however. If you rely too much on the schedule, it can actually make things more difficult for your loved one. Things may often take longer than scheduled, and that’s perfectly fine. The important part is that a routine exists, not that each day is perfectly orchestrated down to the minute.

Remain adaptable. Alzheimer’s disease progresses as time goes on, so the capabilities your loved one has now may not be there in a few years. In addition, some days are better than others. Sometimes your loved one will be worse than their usual, and sometimes they will be better. The more flexible and adaptable you are, the better care you will be able to offer them.

Take care of yourself. Just as you are responsible for caring for your loved one, you are also responsible for caring for yourself. There is no shame in needing a break or asking for help. Don’t forget that you can’t help them if you aren’t at your best.

The most important part of being an Alzheimer’s caregiver is the love and care needed to support your loved one in this difficult time in their life. As long as you try your best and are open to improvement, you will do a good job.

Contact us for more information on Alzheimer’s care.

Why Hydration is Imperative in Eldercare

It might be a matter of amusement when people afraid of the water consider their bodies contain it. The brain, skin, organs and even the bones are made of some percentage of water. Water carries impurities out of the body, helps to maintain body temperature, lubricates the joints and carries necessary nutrients throughout the body. Dehydration occurs when the body doesn’t get enough incoming water. Men generally need about three liters per day, while women require two liters per day to remain properly hydrated.

Hydration in the Elderly

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Staying hydrated is important, as the senior body’s water content naturally decreases with age.

On the other hand, it’s not so funny when it’s our parents or other elderly family members. What isn’t generally recognized is that the senior body stores and uses its fluids (read water) differently. First, the senior body’s water content naturally decreases. Second, aging kidneys are less able to process water and sodium, resulting in inability to contain water during dehydration. Third, the bell inside our elders stops going off with age, the one reminding them that a drink of water would be a good idea. Elders’ thirst button gets turned off, too, so they simply don’t remember to drink anything.

Consequences of Dehydration in the Elderly

Physical events like slip and fall occasions are only the second act of the play. The first act begins in the mind of the senior. The embarrassment of incontinence prevents many elderly persons from drinking the proper amount of water. They are embarrassed at using the bathroom so many times. Confusion or the beginnings of dementia mean elders who simply don’t remember if they’ve eaten or drunk anything in a given time period. Also in the mind of the senior, asking for help due to inability to fetch a drink for himself is another cause of embarrassment. If elders live alone, they perhaps have trouble carrying a bottle or glass of water due to arthritis or the shaking common with other diseases. Frustration, fear and embarrassment cause many seniors to just forget it all together.

The damage done to the elderly body is manifold. Many medications seniors take for various ailments and diseases deplete their bodies of necessary fluids. Since the organs are made primarily of water, they will weaken. The brain, deprived of water, will develop headaches. Bones become brittle, skin dry and subject to injuries and fatigue. Kidney failure and seizures are common. The second act, therefore, is a weakened body susceptible to falls and coma.

How Can We Help Them?

Just saying “oh, all you need is a bottle of water” isn’t enough. Seniors won’t remember, nor will they get it themselves. They need help. Most senior hospitalizations are due to dehydration. More senior deaths are due to dehydration, not the falls it caused. Most eldercare includes monitoring the state of the senior’s hydration. It is necessary to his or her longevity. In the case of an assisted living facility, the personnel will monitor the senior’s water intake. Endeavor Senior Care can help ensure the hydration and health of your loved one. Please contact us today.

Does Your Diabetic Loved One Also Need Dementia Care?

Did you know that if diabetics don’t take proper care of themselves they could end up needing dementia care? A study that appeared in the July 2015 edition of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism indicates it’s true and encourages diabetics to take action sooner than later. Research also shows that people suffering from both may benefit from additional care.

What kind of additional care? The type and level vary per individual. However, in-home caregivers may help people in each of the above situations we’ve described. For example, they may remind diabetics and dementia patients to take their insulin injections or tablets. Licensed nurses, on the other hand, are tasked with skilled, medication management and administration tasks.

By staying on top of their insulin regimen

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Staying on top of diabetes management is crucial to avoid a higher risk of dementia.

s, both dementia and diabetic patients have a better chance of keeping their minds sharp for as long as possible. Plus, they are less likely to have episodes of hyper or hypoglycemia. Such episodes could do more than just jeopardize their thinking further. They could lead to unconsciousness, increased falls risk and other complications.

Having in-home caregivers present could keep diabetics and dementia patients safe during hypo and hyperglycemicevents. For instance, they could offer patients a glass of juice or other simple carbohydrates to bring their glucose levels back to normal during hyperglycemic events. Conversely, they could help patients with a history of hypoglycemia by monitoring their food intake. This includes preparing menu items like thickened liquids and pureed foods.

In addition, people with both illnesses often become incontinent. Those with dementia may be unable to care for themselves after accidents, which could lead to skin breakdown and infections. In-home caregivers could lower that risk by cleaning dementia patients’ skin after accidents and helping them put on fresh clothes. To learn more about how diabetes and dementia care may be given simultaneously, please contact Endeavor Senior Care.

3 Simple Ways to Support a Dementia Caregiver

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Caregiving provided by a loving person can make a huge difference in the person’s life, but the process of caring for someone suffering from dementia can also become all-consuming.

When a person is caring for someone with dementia, the journey can be extremely emotional, stressful and long. It is made even more difficult because there is currently no cure for dementia and very few medical treatments are helpful. Fortunately, caregiving that is provided by a loving person can make a huge difference in the person’s life, but the process of caring for this person can also become all-consuming.

Because of the struggles involved, a caregiver for a dementia patient needs quite a bit of support from those around them. Knowing that there are people who can be relied on will help make the journey much easier. Here are three simple ways to offer support to a dementia caregiver.

Complete Simple Tasks

When providing dementia care even simple tasks, like picking up groceries, can be a challenge. In order to support a caregiver, an outsider can easily complete errands and other simple tasks around the home.

Offer an Outlet

Sometimes a caregiver simply needs a shoulder to lean on when they are struggling. Offering comfort in these times is one of the best ways that a person can help a dementia caregiver. Friends can help give the caregiver time away from their struggles so that they can relax and unwind.

Care for the Medical Needs

Sometimes the dementia patient isn’t the only person who requires medical attention. Plus, it is easy for the caregiver to ignore issues with their own health when they are caring for someone with dementia. In order to support a caregiver, watch for signs that they require medical attention themselves. It is also helpful to ensure that the caregiver is taking care of their health by eating properly and receiving medical assessments.

Although being a dementia caregiver can be a struggle, there are many ways that others can make the journey a little easier. To learn more about how to care for a dementia caregiver, be sure to contact us today.

In-Home Care Professionals

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Does Your Elderly Parent Have Diabetes? Consider Home Healthcare

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Anyone can easily learn how to operate a glucose meter; it involves a simple finger prick for a blood sample and –for most meters—just five seconds to read the result.

Managing Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes is a constant challenge, even more so for seniors who may have lost some manual dexterity, have memory problems or suffer from nerve damage. In-home healthcare may be the best option for some families; however, if you are caring for a loved one with diabetes you should be aware of the following potential issues.

Blood glucose testing is the primary tool for a person with diabetes to manage their disease. Today’s glucose meters tendto be small and can be difficult to handle for persons with limited movement in the hands and fingers.

Anyone can easily learn how to operate a glucose meter; it involves a simple finger prick for a blood sample and –for most meters—just five seconds to read the result. Most diabetics are instructed to test their blood sugar 3-4 times a day.

The result of the blood glucose test will determine what the next dose of insulin or other medication should be. You’ll need to not only learn how to use the meter, but also keep a document handy with doctor’s instructions regarding how to adjust medications based on these test results. Obviously, seniors who have memory problems will need close monitoring to ensure that tests are conducted on schedule and that medications are accurately dispensed.

If your loved one exhibits odd behaviors, don’t assume that these are a result of aging or dementia! Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) reactions can cause slurred speech, dizziness and anxiety; a person experiencing hypoglycemia can appear to be drunk. If you see this kind of behavior you will want to test your loved one’s blood sugar immediately.

Finally, persons with diabetes are prone to develop sores that won’t heal, especially on their feet. If the person has diminished sensation due to nerve damage, a small cut or blister can become gangrenous surprisingly quickly, often leading to amputations. Be sure to check the person’s feet regularly; at least every 3-4 days.

Caring for diabetes is a 24-hour-a-day job that is difficult for a family member to take on; a better option might be to hire a service that provides in-home care for your loved one. If you’re fortunate enough to live in the Arizona Valley, you have the home care experts at your service: Endeavor Senior Care. We provide a full spectrum of in-home care to help your loved one live independently for as long as possible and give you peace of mind. If you have questions or would like to learn more, please contact us.

Study Shows Those Who Care for Seniors Should Increase Protein Intake for Elderly

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Sufficient protein is crucial to maintain muscle mass after age 60.

It is easy to get overwhelmed in the day to day care of the elderly, and forget there are steps you can take to prevent future problems. One of the biggest issues in senior care is the rapid decline in muscle mass over the age of 60, which leads to balance and falling issues. The result can be broken bones and head injuries which require even more care. A recent study shows that increasing protein in a senior citizen’s diet may help overall physical health.

The study, recently published in the Journal of Nutrition, followed 2600 men and women over 60 years of age for several years, recording muscle mass and protein consumption. It was found that for men needed 3 ounces of protein daily and women required 2.6 ounces to maintain muscle mass and lean muscle, which equate to physical strength and wellness.

Some senior citizens are set in their ways, and it can be difficult to introduce new, high-protein foods. Protein can befound in a variety of plant and animal sources, which should be consumed at every meal and in snacks too. Common high-protein foods include nut butter, beans, greek yogurt, fish, chicken, and cheese. If all else fails, protein shakes or nutritional drinks can help boost daily intake.

A diet high in protein is also beneficial for those dealing with heart issues or diabetes. If you are caring for a senior citizen, adding more protein to each meal will certainly help overall health. In addition, it will help seniors maintain muscle mass which leads to better mobility and independence.

For more information and help for caring for an elderly loved one, contact us.

Senior Care Services Offer Loved Ones Personal Choice and Independence

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With a little help, seniors can have lots of independence and end a reliance on family for care.

Providing care is a 24/7 responsibility that takes place 365 days a year, for a lifetime. Understandably, that makes caregiving an impossible job for one person. Blessedly, no one has to take on all of that responsibility alone. There are other people willing to step in and lend a hand so caregivers can take time out to attend to their own needs. Oftentimes, those helping hands may be found by contacting a senior care service.

Senior care services vary in depth, breadth and purpose. Some are designed to provide skilled nursing services and others offer non-medical ones. Non-medical senior care services are primarily intended to provide seniors with opportunities for social interaction and assistance with daily activities. As such, the services may take place in the senior’s home, a public place or a business venue. Sometimes the day care programs are rigid, cold and impersonal. Other times, they’re flexible, personal and full of warmth.

The senior care programs that are flexible, personal and hospitable tend to provide the most benefits to their participants. They allow seniors to develop friendships, remain active in their communities, exercise personal choice and enjoy independence while continuing to manage their health problems at home. Plus, many of the programs’ costs are covered by long-term care insurance. The senior care services offered through Endeavor Home Care are prime examples. They can be personalized to suit a person’s needs and changed whenever necessary.

Consequently, seniors participating in the process don’t feel like they’re being treated like children. They have a choice of pre-screened caregivers and can choose when and where they receive care. Of course they can also dictate how much care is received. For instance, some seniors may merely need assistance with getting out of bed in the morning. Others may want help with the dinner dishes and light housekeeping. To learn more about the various senior care services that are available in your area, please contact us today.

Early Warning Signs that in Home Care is Needed

There is nothing easy about watching our loved ones grow old. They are the ones that we have always turned to in a time of need, but now the roles are reversed and they find themselves leaning more on others. Becoming the caregiver to someone who has always given back to you can be difficult. One of the most important things that you can do when in this situation is to look for early warning signs that in home care is needed.

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It’s time to consider in home care if your loved one is showing symptoms of Alzheimer’s or dementia.

One early sign that a loved one may need homecare is related to their memory. While it is common for people to repeat themselves on occasion, you should definitely note if your loved one does so more than normal. This could be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia or could even be the sign that a stroke has occurred.

Another sign that you should look for is your loved one forgetting common things and misplacing things. Keep in mind that it is not abnormal to forget or misplace something, but putting things like a purse or a pair of shoes in the refrigeratormay be a sign that something more serious is going on.

Other more subtle issues may be reason for concern as well. For example, dramatic mood changes or sudden decreases in interests, appetite or energy may also be a sign that homecare is needed. While these problems can appear in anyone, they often point to more serious health concerns in the elderly.

If you notice any of these changes in your loved one, you may be surprised to find that this could be an indication thathomecare is needed. For best results, consult your loved one’s regular doctor privately about their specific needs. In order to learn more about the signs that indicate that your loved one may need homecare, please contact us.