Three Tips for a Smooth Transition to Home Health Care

It’s a common issue for many families. Busy sandwich generation caregivers being pulled in a million directions as aging parents struggle with the gradual loss of independence.

You begin to notice things slipping around your mother’s house, but even the most subtle mention of bringing in help yields harsh opposition. Mom just isn’t ready to welcome a stranger into her home with open arms; however, you are no longer able to handle everything.

Here are three tips for beginning the transition to home health care.

home health care

Consulting with a geriatric care manager may be a helpful step in the transition to home health care.

  • Bring in a housekeeper for just a few hours each week. Let your loved one share in defining responsibilities; he or she is more apt to accept help with household chores than personal care. Allowing time for a relationship to form will make adding additional services less traumatic.
  • Be honest. Tell your loved one you’re struggling with everything you have on your plate. Explain how much you worry and that it would help alleviate your concerns to know someone was coming in to help with medication and meal preparation while you are working. Including them in the interview and selection process will increase their comfort level.
  • If all else fails, consult with a geriatric care manager for tips on how best to handle your specific situation. A trained professional will evaluate your loved one and help design and introduce a suitable care plan.

Home health care is a great way relieve some of the pressure you, the primary caregiver, are feeling. Contact us to learn more about our services. We look forward to providing personalized, compassionate care that will give you peace of mind and allow your loved one to remain independent for as long as possible.

Home Care for Hip Fracture Patients

home care

Skilled therapists are trained to know what your loved one needs most, from exercises and stretches to encouragement and education.

A recent study shows there are at least 258,000 hip fractures among adults aged 65 and older that lead to hospitalization each year. A more disturbing statistic is one out of five people who suffer a hip fracture die within the first year following the fall. Treatment for a fractured hip includes surgery, a hospital stay, and more often than not a stay in a nursing home.

Life following surgery is a challenge on many levels. Recovery is a slow and painful process. Daily activities easily completed before the injury are now struggles. Family will need to be near to offer assistance with walking, dressing and bathing.

Help is a phone call or click-of-the-mouse away. Home care provided by the professionals from Endeavor Senior Care can make a difference when a patient goes home from the hospital and must begin physical therapy in order to learn to walk properly and be able to complete daily activities.

Family members need no longer stress over knowing what exercises to do, how often they need to be done, and when. The emotional ups and downs of caring for a loved one after major surgery are many; personal connections make it difficult to insist on the hard things being completed.

Skilled therapists are trained to know what the patient needs most. From exercises and stretches to encouragement and education, family members can be confident in the care received. Patients will receive the help needed to regain balance, motor skills, and mobility. Occupational therapists are there to help a patient accomplish those daily tasks such as taking care of personal hygiene and dressing themselves.

Remember, you don’t have to attempt to do this alone. If you have a loved one who has suffered a fall, contact us. Let us help. We are the Home Health resource you can trust.

Senior Care At Home: Preventing Falls

senior care at home

Make sure there is enough room to get around the home without having to step around or over furniture or other items such as pet bowls, shoes, or general clutter.

As we age, even the place we know the best can become a hazard. If you are caring for an elderly loved one make sure their home is as well! Knowing what causes falls in the home can help you to prevent them so educate yourself and take steps to ensure that your loved ones are safe.

Always make sure the way is clear! Make sure there is enough room to get around the home without having to step around or over furniture or other items such as pet bowls, shoes, or general clutter. Make sure that all carpets are secure and remove any high pile throw rugs or rugs that are on slippery surfaces.

Clear out any cluttered areas! If the garage, laundry room, or other areas of the home have a high accumulation of clutter, consider re-organizing so that everything is off the floor. The more room your loved one has to walk, the better. While you are organizing, put the most used items in places that are easy to access, for example laundry detergent and other cleaning materials should be easy to reach without stooping or lifting them off high shelves.

Are there any steps in the home? Make sure any areas where climbing needs to occur, including getting into and out of bathtubs or showers, are equipped with grab bars or handles. Having something to hold on to makes getting places a lot easier. Consider the shower area itself as well. If there are no anti-slip features in the shower, buy a mat or have an anti-slip coating applied.

Consider their shoes! Always make sure that shoes fit properly and are easy to walk in. If their shoes are older, consider getting new shoes that have proper traction and support. If your loved one wears slippers around the house, make sure they stay on their feet without having to shuffle or adjust them constantly. If this is not the case consider buying new slippers or having them wear socks with their slippers to prevent them from falling off or slipping.

Another issue to watch out for are the side effects of any medication your loved one is taking. Many medications cause dizziness or light-headedness and could add to instability especially when standing up after sitting for long periods of time or when bending over. Discuss these side-effects with the person your caring for and make sure they take their time getting around the home.

All of these things can add to a senior’s feeling of independence, but it’s never a bad idea to lend a helping hand. Whether you need simple cleaning services or someone to help your loved one around the home, Endeavor Senior Care is the solution for you! Visit our website to learn more about our senior care at home or contact us to receive information about our services.

Positive Senior Care at Home

Whatever our age, independence is an essential part of our daily life. From birth, we are taught to achieve, to progress in skills; to thrive through our abilities and choices. There is no greater fear than that of losing control and of not being able to do even simple things for ourselves, but when we age this is exactly what happens.

senior care at home

Senior care at home can restore an elderly loved one’s sense of independence and enjoyment of life.

For the elderly, the active normal world which was once their reality suddenly becomes a hostile and lonely environment, and they become, in their own eyes, nothing but a problem.

We all need to feel needed and to know that when we help, our efforts are appreciated and that we have done things right.

Remember, with senior care at home, the aim is to make them feel better, to boost their morale and self-esteem so that they can enjoy their life. Check out our services at Endeavor Senior Care. We offer many services for your peace of mind, and to help give them what they need to flourish.

Daily living skills are things we do every day without even thinking about them. For the elderly, however, many times they must relearn these things We are here to help you to help them find their way. When you need a hand, we are here. Contact us. Our home caregivers are professional, trained, compassionate people with the health and well-being of your elderly loved one in mind. Come to www.EndeavorSeniorCare.com. We can help them, and help you by easing your worries.

Respite Care: An Indispensable Part of Planning for Summer Vacations

respite care

Planning summer activities can quickly get difficult if you have a loved one who can’t be alone.

Planning for summer vacations can be complicated at times, especially when a person’s list of responsibilities includes caring for an ailing loved one. Think about it. There are many healthcare problems that may prevent a person from being alone for any extended length of time. Examples include people with dementia, paralysis, advance stage cancers and neuromuscular diseases.

So, what are the alternatives to traveling with an ailing loved one whose health would be further compromised by participation in long distance, summer vacations? For many Americans, the answer is respite care. Respite care comes in many forms. Sometimes it is provided by long-term care facilities, which may be traumatic for individuals accustom to living at home.

Other times, services are delivered in the ailing individual’s home, either by the hour or as part of live-in, in-home care. Live-in care is often the preferred method because it allows medically compromised individuals and their families to build relationships with their caregivers. This is a vital part of the respite care process, especially when trust is an issue.

In order for family members to feel safe and comfortable while on vacation, they must be able to trust surrogate caregivers implicitly. And we all know that such a high degree of trust is not achieved instantly. It is built upon over the course of continuous care. Families must also have time to work with live-in, in-home caregivers to ensure that their surrogates fully understand their loved ones needs.

In some instances, respite care includes medical services and other times it does not. Therefore, it may also be necessary for families to hire additional staff to help care for their loved ones’ medical needs during the course of a family vacation. With that said, to learn more about the types of respite care services available in the State of Arizona, please contact us atEndeavor Senior Care. We offer one-on-one, in-home care services to individuals and families living in the Phoenix Valley.

The Elderly and the Internet: Applying Mom’s Wisdom To In Home Care

in home care

Websites like Facebook and services like Twitter help give seniors that social interaction where they might otherwise feel alone and isolated.

Seniors who can’t get around like they used to may turn to the internet for their social activities. Websites like Facebook and services like Twitter help give seniors that social interaction where they might otherwise feel alone and isolated. This usually leads to a lot of time at the keyboard. To help avoid repetitive stress syndrome, remember what your mother told you growing up, and apply it to your in home care plan.

“Sit up straight!”

Mom was definitely right about this one. Sitting up straight, not slouching, can be very difficult if you’re at your computer for long periods of time. Muscles want to relax, not remain in a rigidly upright position. As they relax, however, they start to put strain on tendons as your whole frame relaxes. This, in turn, leads to inflammation. If you notice Mom or Dad hunching over at the keyboard, try to find a way to make it easier for them to sit upright. Sometimes a wireless keyboard will do the trick as it allows the user to recline instead of having to lean forward to meet the desk.

“Don’t sit so close to the TV!”

While sitting too close to the monitor can lead to eye trouble, having the computer and peripheral equipment properly placed can help reduce over-stressing muscles and tendons. Laptops are particularly problematic as they are often placed on the lap. This makes a user’s head tip down so they can see the screen and keyboard. This puts unnecessary strain at the neck and shoulders. If they’re resting their arms on the arms of the chair, their elbows will also feel it. Be sure to place peripherals where they can be comfortably reached while maintaining a healthy posture. Use speech recognition software or other adaptive technology to help.

“You’ve been sitting there too long! Go outside and play!”

Taking a break from repetitive tasks is important. It keeps them from being, well, repetitive. If a person has limited movement, they can still take a break by doing anything that doesn’t put them back in front of the monitor. For example, they can get a snack and eat it someplace else. If they eat it in front of the computer, they’re probably going to be too tempted to keep doing what they had been doing.

If they can’t easily get way from the computer, introduce them to other activities that don’t use the same action. For example, if they’ve been doing a lot of “point-and-click”, suggest they open an eBook or go to a heavily text-based website and read. (Wikipedia has a “random article button”. While user-generated content may have accuracy issues, it’s at least entertaining if not educational!)

“Clean up your room! It looks like a disaster!”

Keeping the computer area free of clutter will give them room to stretch and to move around. Being encased in stuff can make a person inadvertently start to hunch down and keep them from moving easily. This can keep a person from taking much-deserved breaks.

“Relax, it’s not the end of the world!”

Even if the computer area is well-organized and free of clutter, they take regular breaks, and get away from the screen once in a while, they can still have problems with Repetitive Stress Syndrome. Why? Repetitive stress in day-to-day life can keep a person tense and wound up. This steady pressure on your muscles will cause damage to your muscles and tendons as well as your state of mind.

Learning how to prioritize concerns and how to cope with situations that can’t be controlled is paramount to good health. According to Statistic Brain, more than 3 quarters of the US population has regular stress, with more than half suffering mentally and/or physically from it. By learning how to cope with stress, whether through a therapist or simple relaxation techniques, they’ll not only better avoid repetitive stress syndrome, but may also discover a healthier lifestyle!

RSS’s Other Names

Repetitive Stress Syndrome goes by many names: bursitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, Dupuytren’s contracture, epicondylitis, ganglion, rotator cuff syndrome, tendonitis (or tendinitis), tenosynovitis, trigger finger, or writer’s cramp. Whichever form you have, it’s not pleasant at all. It’s very uncomfortable and can be very damaging if left untreated.

Mom was right

She was either your best friend, or she was a creature from another planet. Whether she gave you these tips as gentle nudges or as thundering commands from on high, the fact is that these simple things can help reduce anyone’s chances for developing Repetitive Stress Syndrome, especially seniors. If they have done all of these things and continue to have problems with pain, tingling, numbing, or weakness, they should see a doctor. They might be able to get away with anti-inflammatory medication or a heat pack. But if it’s a more developed stage of Repetitive Stress Syndrome, the doctor will know what is needed to treat it.

For more help and resources in taking care of your elderly loved ones at home, contact us.

And if you hear your mom saying “I told you so!”, just admit she was right on this one!

Elder Care: Helping Chase the Fountain of Youth One Discovery at a Time

What if the elusive fountain of youth wasn’t really a fountain at all? What if the secret to staying young and healthy came in the form of anti-aging drugs instead? The latter is a question currently being posed by people in the elder care industry thanks to a recent round of research conducted by learned individuals associated with The Scripps Research Institute and others. The research focused on identifying and destroying senescent cells.

elder care

New advances in research may bring us one step closer to turning back the clock.

It is widely believed that by identifying and destroying senescent cells, humankind may be able to circumvent diseases commonly associated with aging. However, until now, elder care providers were not sure how to go about it without causing additional damage to their patients. The recently released research paper provided a suggestion on how to solve that problem, which includes a proposed, new class of drugs. The drugs are designed, in part, to kill the senescent cells, which are then disposed of by the body. Additional research, including clinical trials, still needs to be done on their long and short-term usage.

Until researchers answer lingering questions, the new class of drugs will not be put into widespread use. However, there are still actions that may be taken by aging Americans hoping to retain their youth for as long as possible. Let’s take the social interaction provided by home healthcare agencies in Arizona as an example. Organizations such as the National Institute on Aging and the American Society on Aging has consistently insisted that people who maintain healthy relationships with others tend to fare better overall than those individuals who isolate themselves from the world.

Elder care providers can also help aging individuals maintain their physical strength, dexterity, senses, cognition and weight as well. Although those activities may not stop the proverbial clock, they’ll at least make aging Americans feel better about themselves and the world around them. To learn more about elder care options that have the potential to keep seniors feeling youthful, please contact Endeavor Senior Care today.

Terry Pratchett Gives Dementia Care a Patient’s Face

The recent passing of Sir Terry Pratchett offers a rare view of dementia care, a view from the patient’s perspective. If you don’t know Sir Terry, he wrote fantasy and science fiction, publishing more than 70 books. He is best known for his whimsical Discworld series, which includes some 40 volumes set in “a flat world perched on the backs of four elephants which, in turn, stand on the back of a giant turtle.” His obituary from the BBC recounts the details of a remarkable life.

dementia care

Terry Prachett wrote poignantly about the effects of dementia.

It is another of his works that provides his unique view of dementia. You see, Sir Terry suffered from posterior cortical atrophy, a rare variant of Alzheimer’s disease which affects vision. He was diagnosed in 2008 and put his fame behind a push for more research. In 2013, he was asked to provide the inaugural entry to Alzheimer’s Research UK’s dementia blog, which is dedicated to telling the stories in dementia patients. He wrote:

“There isn’t one kind of dementia. There aren’t a dozen kinds. There are hundreds of thousands. Each person who lives with one of these diseases will be affected in uniquely destructive ways. . . . Dementia attacks those facets which make us who we are, and it’s a deeply personal attack that defies prediction.”

Sir Terry wrote about the fear the dementia inspires in all of us. “Dementia vies with cancer in an unsavoury battle of the scariest, but it must be said that some lucky people will survive cancer.” That fear infects not only the patients, but their family and friends as well. Those loved ones are the foundation of what he calls “a trained and compassionate care system” which includes family and caregivers working together.

If your loved one has dementia, selecting a caregiver is one of the most important decisions that you will make. Contact us to help you find someone with the training and compassion that your loved one needs.

Best Eldercare Tips for Distracted Driving Awareness Month

eldercare

Just because they can’t drive doesn’t mean they have to lose their independence.

Did Distracted Driving Awareness Month (April) have you wondering whether or not it’s time to take the car keys away from mom and dad? If so, welcome to the club. It’s a common problem that adult children wrestle with each year. On one hand, there’s mom and dad’s need for independence. On the other, there’s the worry that their aging senses will put them and others in grave danger. So keeping that in mind, we’ve put together a few eldercare tips to help our friends, family and community members at large decide what to do:

  • Check the expiration date on mom or dad’s driver’s license and then turn towards your local Department of Motor Vehicles. Many have laws in place that require people 65 years of age and older to either renew their licenses in person or submit to additional testing. The additional testing will help give you peace of mind as well as make the DMV the bad guy, not you, should their licenses need to be revoked.
  • If your local DMV doesn’t offer such services, turn towards your parents’ doctors instead. Ask them to evaluate mom and dad. Afterward, sit down with the doctor and your parents to discuss the results. There may be actions mom and dad can take to improve their vision, hearing and reflexes. Examples include getting laser surgery, exercising, playing brain games and purchasing high-quality hearing aids. If not, the doctors may have no choice but to recommend license revocation.
  • Remember, when it comes time to take the keys away, it doesn’t mean that mom and dad’s independence must end. There are eldercare options available that can make all the difference. For instance, caregivers or agencies may help provide mom or dad with safe, reliable transportation. They may also offer in-home care services that will limit the need for traveling outside of the home.

To learn more about them and other eldercare tips for keeping parents safe but independent, please contact us. At Endeavor Senior Care, we will work with elderly residents who’ve had their driver’s licenses taken away as well as those who are still safely on the road.