Google Street View Helps Dementia Patients to Take a Ride Down Memory Lane

The Alzheimer’s Reading Room has been researching a new activity for older adults struggling with dementia. The activity is called BikeAround and it uses stationary bikes and Google Street View to give the elderly a chance to explore safely – perhaps even revisiting places long forgotten. Location triggers alot of memories so the hope is that giving dementia patients a chance to “go back” to old homes and locations can improve their interactions and healthy living.

Key Takeaways:

  • BikeAround is a device which incorporates a stationary bike in combination with Google Street View to give dementia patients a nostalgic ride down familiar streets.
  • Studies have shown that our most intense memories are linked to locations.
  • Scientists believe that when physical and mental stimulation are combined it creates dopamine in the brain which can affect memory management.

“I like this because it gives the dementia patient a real experience; and, I believe this would help patients to become calmer and easier to deal with. Any activity that a person living with dementia engages in usually leads to better behavior.”

Read more: http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2017/09/google-street-view-helps-dementia-patients-to-ride-down-memory-lane.html

Busting Senior-Care Myths: My Parents Don’t Qualify for VA Benefits

Navigating health benefits and care for seniors can be difficult and expensive, and one can’t always be sure if full coverage will be awarded. Senior Advisor.com lists five “myths” that exist about VA coverage and how Aid & Attendance pension benefit coverage can help with the rightful care veterans. Included is information about who qualifies(more than just career veterans or those injured in combat), where you have to live to qualify and whether or not spouses could also receive those benefits.

Key Takeaways:

  • Aid and Attendance can help pay for veterans to receive help in self-care even though many don’t think they are qualified.
  • The amount available to vets is around $1700 per month with surviving spouses qualifying for $1153 in benefits.
  • Vets can qualify if they served 90 days of active duty and at least 1 day during Congress defined times of war, but it takes a while to be approved.

“It’s true that your parents must meet the VA pension eligibility requirements to qualify for the Aid & Attendance benefit.”

Read more: https://www.senioradvisor.com/blog/2017/09/busting-senior-care-myths-my-parents-dont-qualify-for-va-benefits/

dementia care gilbert

Depression and Aging: It’s Time to Stop the Madness

As individuals increase in their age and maturity levels, and begin to enter their senior years, it has been commonly found that they develop signs and symptoms of depression in their behaviors. However, although this has become commonplace, recent studies claim that this is not necessarily the norm. Rather, depression has been found to be an easily and effectively avoidable issue in the old age, if certain best practices are implemented by the individuals and their families around them.

Key Takeaways:

  • Depression is a health problem that can be treated like other health problems. It is not a normal part of the ageing process.
  • You should talk openly with people who are experiencing depression.
  • A lot of employees at assisted living facilities are not properly trained to deal with depression in their patients.

“Mental illness has long been a taboo topic in our society—but even more so when it comes to older adults. While ageism influences many to assume it’s just “normal” to be sad when we get closer to end of life, the truth remains that depression has become one of the greatest preventable epidemics to hit the aging population.”

Read more: https://changingaging.org/culture-change/depression-aging-time-stop-madness/

Good moods may boost flu shot efficacy for seniors

It is often said that one’s mood and attitude can greatly impact their overall mental and physical health levels. Those who are generally happier and in better moods tend to have more prominent and lengthy livelihoods, while those who are in bad moods face more complications throughout their lives. A recent study conducted found that this ranges even into the flu shot effectiveness, as results showed that seniors with better attitudes saw more efficacy in the use of the flu shot.

Key Takeaways:

  • Getting a flu shot significantly reduces the chance you will catch the virus.
  • Vaccines are not as effective in seniors as they are for younger people.
  • The mind is connected to the body. Having positive spirits while getting a shot may increase the efficacy of it.

“A new study suggests that seniors who get their flu shots while in a good mood have a better response to the vaccine.”

Read more: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319548.php

5 common questions families have about financing senior living

These are some questions people often have about financing senior living. How can I pay for senior living? You can take out bridge loans, rent your seniors home that they will be leaving, or check out assistance programs if they are a veteran. How much does it cost? The countrywide average was $3,628 per month. Does Medicare pay for senior living? No, it does not pay for it. Can you use life insurance to pay for it? You would have to take a “life settlement” which has some pros and cons.

Key Takeaways:

  • When looking into senior living it is good to know that their are several loan options that are available
  • Seniors who own their homes can rent out their homes and use those monthly payments to finance their senior living needs
  • When considering senior living it is good to be aware that you don’t have to pay for services you don’t need which

“If you’re like most families, you and your senior loved one have lots of questions about paying for senior living.”

Read more: https://www.sunriseseniorliving.com/blog/september-2017/answering-the-most-common-questions-families-have-about-financing-senior-living.aspx

New wellness study shows just how sticky wearables can be, even among seniors

Dr. Mitesh Patel has had a significant interest in individuals who use wearable products for extended periods of time, especially when it comes to seniors. Patel studied individuals who were over 65 in order to see how many of them continued to utilize the devices in the future. Over 90% of the seniors in the study actually continued to use the wearable devices six months later! Even though it may be harder to find wearables that cater specifically to seniors, they are shown to stick to using them for longer periods over time.

Key Takeaways:

  • A high number of users of wearable tracking devices that once they started using them continued to use them for at least 6 months
  • The Fitbit is the most used wearable device with apple product devices coming in as the second most used device
  • Employers can find away to incorporate these devices into their own fitness programs within their companies promoting a healthier staff

“The interest in improving the sustained use of wearables goes beyond employer programs, according to the Annals of Internal Medicine study. It also applies to data collection for precision medicine initiatives to better target interventions.”

Read more: https://medcitynews.com/2017/09/new-wellness-program-study-shows-just-sticky-wearables-can-even-among-seniors/

Dietary supplement may help older adults to keep warm

Senior citizens are uniquely vulnerable to cold temperatures, as the human body’s capacity to sustain internal warmth gradually weakens with age. However, thanks to a recent scientific breakthrough, there is new hope that things might soon change. Scientists found that L-carnitine, a dietary supplement known to boost levels of the lipid acylcarnitine, helped aging mice retain bodily warmth even as external temperatures grew cooler. Scientists believe a direct link exists between the amount of acylcarnitines flowing through a body and the body’s ability to self-warm.

Key Takeaways:

  • Using a supplement that can increase the amount of brown fat in older adults is key to helping them adapt to the cold
  • Seeing the increase in the lipid acyl carnitines in the research done in this instance is seen as a heathy response
  • The use of brown fats that are activated by the supplement acyl carnitines is a step in the right direction for preventing hypothermia in older adults

“Older adults are known to be more sensitive to the cold, and new research has found that a nutritional supplement called L-carnitine might one day be used as a way to jump-start the body’s central heating.”

Read more: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319291.php

Alzheimer’s/Dementia Care Phoenix

Busting Senior-Care Myths: You Can’t Get Hospice Care at Home

Of the many myths and misconceptions that exist around the field of senior care, among the most persistent is the false belief that hospice care is only offered in hospice facilities rather than being an option for in-home treatment. In reality, the options for hospice care are actually much more flexible than this. A patient can receive hospice care in his or her own home; in the home of a loved one, whether that person be a blood relative or just a close friend; within an assisted senior living community; in a senior nursing home facility; and at the hospital, to name a few of the options available.

Key Takeaways:

  • If your parents can’t receive hospice care in their own home, the next best option is the home of whoever is willing to serve as a primary caregiver and handle the logistics of hospice care visits.
  • If your parents live in a nursing home, they can still receive visits from hospice care workers, and many hospice advocates strongly recommend that families use the Medicare hospice resources available to them.
  • These homey, live-in facilities can be the best option for people who need hospice services, can’t live at home

“advocates of hospice care say it’s more accurate to think of hospice as a type of care rather than as a place.”

Read more: https://www.senioradvisor.com/blog/2017/10/busting-senior-care-myths-you-cant-be-at-home-for-hospice-care/

5 most common balance problems seniors experience

As people’s bodies grow older, it can become harder and harder for them to maintain their balance. However, if an elderly loved one is having an unusually difficult time keeping themselves stable on their feet, then it’s worth investigating whether something more than just the aging process is at play. Common balance related problems include vertigo, Ménière’s Disease, Labyrinthitis, various chronic illnesses, and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome. For any of these, symptoms are likely to include strange feelings in the ear.

Key Takeaways:

  • Hearing loss can affect balance and increase the risk of falls.
  • Falls happen to one of three older Americans each year and remain a leading cause of disability among seniors.
  • If balance problems persist, it is important to take a hard look at the senior’s home environment.

“Weakened muscles or poor vision can compromise our ability to remain steady on our feet. As can some medications. But the natural aging process doesn’t have to mean you’re constantly on the brink of falling.”

Read more: https://www.sunriseseniorliving.com/blog/september-2017/5-most-common-balance-problems-seniors-experience.aspx

Alzheimer’s/Dementia Care Phoenix

Women’s dementia risk increased by midlife hypertension

Women in their forties or older who have high blood pressure, also known as hypertension, are more likely to get dementia than those without hypertension. This does not seem to hold true for men. Millions of Americans have hypertension, which puts them at risk for many health problems such as heart disease. A research study by Rachel Whitmer assessed over seven thousand adults in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California healthcare system to see if there was a link between high blood pressure and dementia.

Key Takeaways:

  • Women in their forties that have hypertension have an increased risk of developing dementia.
  • Men do not have an increased risk of dementia if they have hypertension.
  • These findings are from research performed by Rachel Whitmer of the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research.

“Around 75 million adults in the United States have high blood pressure, or hypertension, putting them at increased risk of heart disease and stroke.”

Read more: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319637.php