Multiple Sclerosis

Managing Multiple Sclerosis at Home

The providers of in-home senior care in Chandler, AZ have compiled some tips for managing multiple sclerosis at home.

As Jane Austen once explained, “There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.” And for anyone with a chronic disease, like multiple sclerosis (MS), comfort is essential, as is remaining safe. Our in-home care experts are here to help with managing multiple sclerosis at home. Read more

In-Home Care for Multiple Sclerosis

Choosing In-Home Care for Multiple Sclerosis

The providers of Mesa in-home care discuss choosing in-home care for multiple sclerosis.

While there’s no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS), hundreds of thousands of people in the United States are diagnosed with the condition – as many as 400,000 people. Of that, 86% of MS patients identify fatigue as the most common symptom of the disease. Treatment options vary, and can include outpatient treatment and in-home care for multiple sclerosis. The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown; it is not contagious or known to be hereditary, but elements that may come into play include: Read more

manage heart medications

Endeavor’s Phoenix In-Home Caregivers Share Tips to Manage Heart Medications

manage heart medications

Consistency and following doctor’s orders is key when it comes to taking heart medications.

If you have heart disease, you know it is essential to take your heart disease medicine just as prescribed. But what exactly does that mean? Here are several helpful tips from Endeavor In-Home Care to manage heart medications safely: Read more

Alzheimer's

Responding to Dementia Confusion: Should I Play Along?

Dementia confusion, a typical occurrence in Alzheimer’s, can lead to recent memories being forgotten about or distorted, while memories from the more distant past usually stay unaffected. This can cause past events to make more sense to a senior with dementia than the present. A person’s alternate reality can be the senior’s way of making sense of the present through past experience.

Seniors with Alzheimer’s disease often have problems expressing themselves, and at times their alternate reality has more to do with a physical requirement or a distinct feeling they want to express rather than the actual words they are saying.

For example:

  • “I need to deliver all these casseroles to the neighbors before the end of the day.” Though these casseroles do not exist, the words could actually represent a need for meaning in everyday life or wanting to be involved in an activity. A suitable response to find out more could be, “Why did you make casseroles for our neighbors?”
  • “When will my wife be coming home?” This question may be more about a need for affection or acceptance or a home-cooked meal than it could be about wishing to see his wife, who passed away many years ago. An appropriate reaction to uncover more might be, “Why would you like to see her?”

Keeping a diary of these kinds of events can help you notice a pattern in the older person’s dementia confusion. The more you listen in and pay close attention, the easier it will become to understand the thinking behind the alternate reality and the ideal way to react.

Is It Alright to Play Along?

As long as the scenario isn’t going to be unsafe or improper, it is perfectly fine to play along with the senior’s alternate reality. Doing so won’t make the dementia worse. Keep in mind, the senior’s reality is true to him/her and playing along can make your loved one feel more comfortable.

If the situation is inappropriate or may possibly cause harm to the older adult, try to respond to the perceived need while redirecting him/her to something safer or more appropriate.

Bear in mind these 3 actions:

  1. Reassure the older adult.
  2. React to his/her need.
  3. Redirect if required.

Also, call on the caregiving team at Endeavor In-Home Care, providing senior home care in Phoenix and the surrounding areas, including specialized dementia care. Our caregivers are on hand to provide compassionate, professional respite care services for family care providers who could use some time to rest and recharge. Contact us any time to learn more at 480-498-2324.

Denying A Dementia Diagnosis

Anosognosia – Why Is My Parent Denying a Dementia Diagnosis?

Dementia can have many side effects,including anosognosia.

“How on earth could you think that I have dementia? There is not a single thing wrong with me!”

If a senior loved one with a dementia diagnosis communicates feelings like this, you may think to yourself that the senior is essentially in denial and reluctant to admit to such a concerning diagnosis. Yet there could be a different reason: anosognosia, or someone’s actual unawareness that he or she is affected by dementia. Read more

Older Adult Purpose

Activities for Older Adults with Purpose and Meaning

Try these unique activities for older adults that build self-esteem.

Search online for the words “activities for seniors” and you’ll probably find an assortment of games, crafts, memory-stimulating puzzles, and of course, the requisite bingo. What you will not find, unless you search much longer, are the purposeful, philanthropic activities that bring purpose to our lives. And yet, if you ask older adults what they would most like to do, the majority of them will not mention art projects, games, or bingo. What they want most of all is to feel useful. Read more

Independence for Seniors

The Art of Balancing Providing Help with Maintaining Senior Independence

Help preserve a senior’s sense of purpose by allowing him or her some independence

“Here, I can help you with that.”

“Be careful!”

“You can just sit here and rest; I’ll handle that.”

How often have we said things along the lines of these to seniors, with the best intentions of course? We want to do everything we can when caring for older adults to ensure they are safe and to take care of them in the same way they took care of us when we were younger. Yet, there’s a concealed threat in trying to do too much for seniors and depriving them of the opportunity to do as much as possible for themselves – the danger of harming senior independence and a sense of meaning and purpose in life. Read more

Caring for elderly parents

Tips to Brighten Everyone’s Day When Caring for Elderly Parents

Let our Phoenix area home care team help improve quality of life for a senior loved one in your life.

Millions of Americans have found themselves in the role of providing senior care for an older loved one, and although serving as a family caregiver is incredibly rewarding in many ways, the day-to-day duties involved with senior care can come to be monotonous for both the caregiver and the older adult. The Phoenix home care experts at Endeavor In-Home Care want to assist you in putting the fun back in your loved one’s day-to-day routine. All it takes is a bit of ingenuity! Try some of these suggestions to help brighten your loved one’s day and make caring for elderly parents more enjoyable: Read more

Activities for seniors

How Personalized Activities for Seniors Increase Quality of Life

Call on Endeavor for personalized care & customized activities for a senior loved one in your life.

Is a senior loved one participating in activities on a regular basis, or is she stuck in a rut that commonly is comprised of watching television, eating, and sleeping? Particularly during this time of quarantining and isolation, it can be challenging to maintain an active and involved way of living – but it’s vitally important for the health and quality of life of older adults. Read more

Long Distance Caregiver

Long Distance Caregiver Tips: How to Help Older Parents Remain Safe and Independent

Living at a distance from older loved ones can make the need for home care easier to miss. As a matter of fact, many adult children of aging parents never even realize that Mom and Dad need help until they return home for a visit or spend extended time together over the holiday season. If you’re a long distance caregiver for a senior loved one, it becomes that much more essential to have a plan in place for emergency situations and care. Read more