Elder Care in Scottsdale AZ: Signs of Alzheimer's

Is Your Parent’s Difficulty with Problem Solving Normal or a Sign of Alzheimer’s?

Everyone has trouble solving problems or getting organized at times in their life.

When, however, may these signs of difficulty indicate that there could be something more serious happening? Alzheimer’s disease is an issue that most family caregivers put a considerable amount of thought into throughout their care experience with their senior parent, and it is important to be able to recognize early warning signs of the progression. While memory loss is the first thing that most people think about when they consider the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, the reality is that there are many other signs that could indicate that your senior is at the beginning of their progression with the disease.

 

One early warning sign of Alzheimer’s disease is difficulty solving problems or making plans.

While it is perfectly normal to occasionally experience confusion when making complex plans or when managing a challenging task, such as balancing a checkbook, if your parent is having frequent or marked difficulty with planning or problem solving, it may be time to discuss it with their doctor.

 

Some problem solving or planning difficulties that may be an early warning sign of Alzheimer’s disease include:

-A marked difficulty with concentration and seeming distracted when they should be focusing on a specific task

-Difficulty following a set of tasks, particularly something familiar such as a recipe that they have made several times before

-Inability to keep up with their regular household bills

-Receiving cut-off notices for their utilities

-Getting overdraft notices for their bank account

-Inability to make simple organizational choices such as how to put items away in a drawer or linen closet

 

Starting senior care for your aging parent can be one of the best decisions that you can make for them during the course of your care journey.

Having a senior home care services provider in the home with your aging parent can ensure that they have ongoing access to the care, support, and assistance that they need to manage their individual needs, challenges, and limitations in the ways that are right for them while also respecting the care that you give them on a regular basis. This means that your parent can stay healthy, safe, comfortable, and happy while also pursuing a lifestyle that is an active, engaged, and independent as possible throughout their later years. As their family caregiver, this will give you confidence and peace of mind that your senior will get everything that they need both when you are with them and when you are not.

 

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Elder Care in Scottsdale, AZ, please contact the caring staff at Endeavor Home Care today. Call  (480) 535-6800.

Source:

https://www.alz.org

Neurology Questions

Rethinking Alzheimer’s Disease—How Opposite Thinking May Lead to a Cure

Neurology QuestionsThose of us who follow the latest research in Alzheimer’s disease are all too familiar with the troublesome amyloid plaques thought to be linked to Alzheimer’s. But is it possible that the buildup is, in fact, helpful? Read more

Spending time with grandma

Not Sure How to Act When Visiting Someone with Alzheimer’s Disease? These Tips Can Help.

Spending time with grandmaIt may sometimes be a bit intimidating to know what to mention and how to behave when spending some time with a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease. And, sadly, due to a number of inherent elements of the disease, oftentimes family and friends feel so uncomfortable that they avoid going to see the person anymore. Understanding more information on the disease and things to anticipate, and planning ahead about how to best manage challenging behaviors can help.

The chief difficulties family caregivers and friends encounter with their loved one with Alzheimer’s disease fall into one of three categories: changes in behavior, changes in memory and communication ability; and the level of difficulty will probably fluctuate based on the particular stage of the disease the senior is currently experiencing.

To help overcome these challenges while making the visit as enjoyable as you can, Endeavor Home Care’s Alzheimer’s care professionals in Arizona recommend the following approach:

Begin your visit with a smile, and be prepared to re-introduce yourself if needed.

Use very simple language and brief sentences, and talk slowly.

Refrain from arguing with or correcting the senior.

Bring photos from a favorite past memory for reminiscing.

Listen to a number of the person’s favorite tunes together, and maybe even ask him or her to dance!

Taking a walk together if at all possible, or just about any other physical exercise, can make the visit more fun for both of you.

Remain calm during your visit, even when the senior gets agitated or exhibits inappropriate behavior.

Keep a sense of respect during your conversation, understanding the senior may repeat questions and statements.

Reduce distractions in order to give the person your full attention.

Above all, bear in mind who the individual was pre-dementia, and remind the person what she or he did which has inspired you or helped you become the person that you are today.

For additional tips on effective communications with those with Alzheimer’s disease, or for specialized hands-on care assistance, contact the Arizona dementia care team at Endeavor Home Care. Our skilled dementia caregivers are fully trained and experienced in a number of tactics to make sure seniors with Alzheimer’s disease remain secure and safe and are able to live life to the fullest, with the utmost respect and compassion all of the time. Call us at (480) 535-6800 or contact us online for more details.

Mature women talking

Dividing Caregiver Costs Without Causing Family Uproar

Mature women talkingDo you recall how challenging it could be when you were young to learn the lesson of sharing with your brothers and sisters? While the incredible importance of taking into consideration other people’s feelings, and also being fair, was impressed upon us early on, it may still be a challenging goal to minimize sibling squabbles regarding complicated decisions we struggle with in adulthood – such as how to fairly divide caregiver costs and requirements for our aging parents. Read more

Senior man sitting on sofa

Anosognosia – Is Mom Denying She Has Dementia?

Senior man sitting on sofa“How can you say I have Alzheimer’s disease? There is nothing wrong with me!”

If you’ve ever heard a senior loved one with dementia frustratingly express this or perhaps a very similar sentiment, you might have believed the person was just in denial and not willing to accept a difficult diagnosis. The simple truth is, however, that oftentimes people who have dementia and other conditions are experiencing anosognosia – an unawareness of their impairment. Read more

Mature radiologist talking to senior patient

When Less Is Best: Seniors Can Receive Too Much Health Care

Mature radiologist talking to senior patientWe desire the right health care for our loved ones, but is it possible that on occasion, less is best? Based upon a recent report published in Plos One by Dr. Martin Makary, professor of surgery and health policy at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, a full 21% of medical care we receive is unneeded – meaning that millions of individuals subjected to various treatment plans, screenings and scans are getting little if any benefit. And these kinds of unwarranted health services come at a cost: up to $210 billion each year, as reported by the National Academy of Medicine. Read more

Smiling Mature nurse embracing senior woman and holding a Christmas gift while sitting on the sofa.

Use Your Holiday Visit to Check on Senior Safety

Smiling Mature nurse embracing  senior woman and holding a Christmas gift while sitting on the sofa.Living across the country from family makes it hard to see our aging loved ones as frequently as we’d like, but during the holidays, families make it a priority to spend quality time with each other – making it the perfect opportunity to ascertain senior safety for your loved one. There are quite a few red flags that are unnoticed in weekly telephone conversations, emails, or even through Skype, but which often become very clear when the family gets together during the holiday season. Read more

Photo of elderly woman having breakfast with her caregivers

How to Deal with Dementia at the Holidays

Photo of elderly woman having breakfast with her caregiversViewing the holidays through the lens of Alzheimer’s disease can seem to be anything but merry and bright. Family may perhaps be overwhelmed with caregiving responsibilities, and the disruption to routine can result in additional distress for a senior learning how to deal with dementia at the holidays. Read more

We Can All Lend a Hand in the Search for an Alzheimer’s Cure

The world of Alzheimer’s disease research is expanding, and now there’s an easy way all of us can bring about the discovery of an Alzheimer’s cure. With an online game, Stall Catchers, many people are dedicating time to going through slides of mouse brains to aid research workers in establishing the effectiveness of addressing cerebral blood flow issues to reverse loss of memory.

An element of the developing trend in “citizen science,” Stall Catchers blends today’s technology with the overall population’s desire to really make a difference in the world around them. Huge numbers of volunteers give their valuable time every day to causes that include diagnosing malaria, storm damage tracking, and even attempting to find signs of extraterrestrial intelligence.

And it’s already helping. Stall Catchers volunteers’ hard work made a direct impact on achieving the finding that impaired circulation is not related to the amyloid plaques connected with Alzheimer’s disease, processing slides at a speed that might take a single lab researcher an entire week in as little as an hour. With government funding for Alzheimer’s research capped out at $986 million during the past year (and at least $2 billion needed every year, according to the Alzheimer’s Association), volunteer researchers are indispensable.

The next phase in this particular study is to search for a treatment that can address these blood flow blockages without reducing patients’ immune systems – an effort that involves the monotonous examination of more than tens of thousands of images. And even though it’s going to take a lot of time, even with an enthusiastic audience of volunteers, people that have a loved one dealing with the disease find purpose in the ability to do something to work towards an Alzheimer’s cure, at any time the urge arises. According to Judy Johanson, whose father is dealing with the disease, “You don’t have to wait for the walk or the triathlon to do this. You can do this whenever you need to.”

If you’ve got a senior loved one with Alzheimer’s disease, you’re able to register to be part of the Stall Catchers community  in order to assist, and contact Endeavor Home Care’s San Diego dementia care team and our Arizona senior care experts for in-home assistance with specialized Alzheimer’s and dementia care. Our fully trained, experienced, and compassionate caregivers are available as much or as little as needed – whether only a few hours a week to supply family caregivers with a little time to themselves, or full-time, around-the-clock care to keep seniors safe and well. Call us at (480) 535-6800 to learn more.

dangers of dementia

The Dangers of Dementia – When a Loved One Breaks the Law

It may seem astounding – a sweet, elderly, occasionally baffled grandmother with dementia being handcuffed and placed under arrest. But nevertheless, that very scene is occurring at an alarming rate among seniors, more than 100,000 of them, according to the current data – an increase of roughly 30% in the past decade. This dramatic increase in arrests of the elderly might be partially because of the increase in the population of the elderly, as well as the increase in medical diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia.

Along with the anxiety and aggression that can come with Alzheimer’s, as well as other erratic behaviors that might require police intervention, one solution lies in education. Dr. Brie Williams, geriatrician and director of the University of California, San Francisco’s Criminal Justice Aging Project, highlights the necessity for more effective police responses to dementia-induced actions. In short, this involves identifying the answer to, “Is there a medical reason behind engaging in what’s normally regarded as criminal behavior?”

And in addition to criminal concerns, some other situations concerning older adults with dementia are more often requiring law enforcement to step in, such as people with Alzheimer’s wandering off and getting lost, or being asked to check up on the elderly at the request of worried members of the family, neighbors, friends, or medical personnel.

Thankfully, the San Francisco Police Department has taken measures to make certain its law enforcement team is coached in appropriate intervention methods, as well as given helpful information on beneficial services and local resources to help the elderly and lessen the dangers of dementia. With other law enforcement departments nationwide expressing interest in implementing the same programs, the hope is that increased empathy and understanding of dementia will help people better support individuals in desperate need of specialized care to live more full, productive and undisruptive lives.

For professional Alzheimer’s and dementia care, guidelines, and resources, contact the Scottsdale home care experts at Endeavor Home Care. Our fully trained and experienced professional dementia care team delivers patient, consistent care that brings comfort to family caregivers, keeping their loved ones safe at home, helping them engage in mentally stimulating pursuits and physical activity as appropriate, and taking care of daily tasks that require assistance. Beginning with the creation of a customized care plan, that plan is then implemented and adjusted ongoing as needs change. Serving Scottsdale and the surrounding area, call us at (480) 535-6800 to learn more.