Tips for Alzheimers Care

alzheimers care

Some days are better than others, so the more flexible and adaptable you are, the better care you will be able to offer your loved one.

Having a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease can be a difficult process, especially if you are the primary caregiver. Your loved one likely requires constant support, and having to know what to do and how can make you feel almost as confused as your loved one. But there are a few ways to improve the quality of Alzheimer’s care you provide:

Use schedules to your advantage. With careful scheduling, you can plan your loved one’s days so that they are as comfortable as possible. The more consistent a routine you can establish, the less confusion they will experience. In addition, if they have to do something complicated or deviate from the routine, schedule that during the time of day they are the most alert and agreeable.

Don’t turn the schedule into a crutch, however. If you rely too much on the schedule, it can actually make things more difficult for your loved one. Things may often take longer than scheduled, and that’s perfectly fine. The important part is that a routine exists, not that each day is perfectly orchestrated down to the minute.

Remain adaptable. Alzheimer’s disease progresses as time goes on, so the capabilities your loved one has now may not be there in a few years. In addition, some days are better than others. Sometimes your loved one will be worse than their usual, and sometimes they will be better. The more flexible and adaptable you are, the better care you will be able to offer them.

Take care of yourself. Just as you are responsible for caring for your loved one, you are also responsible for caring for yourself. There is no shame in needing a break or asking for help. Don’t forget that you can’t help them if you aren’t at your best.

The most important part of being an Alzheimer’s caregiver is the love and care needed to support your loved one in this difficult time in their life. As long as you try your best and are open to improvement, you will do a good job.

Contact us for more information on Alzheimer’s care.

Does Your Diabetic Loved One Also Need Dementia Care?

Did you know that if diabetics don’t take proper care of themselves they could end up needing dementia care? A study that appeared in the July 2015 edition of The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism indicates it’s true and encourages diabetics to take action sooner than later. Research also shows that people suffering from both may benefit from additional care.

What kind of additional care? The type and level vary per individual. However, in-home caregivers may help people in each of the above situations we’ve described. For example, they may remind diabetics and dementia patients to take their insulin injections or tablets. Licensed nurses, on the other hand, are tasked with skilled, medication management and administration tasks.

By staying on top of their insulin regimen

dementia care

Staying on top of diabetes management is crucial to avoid a higher risk of dementia.

s, both dementia and diabetic patients have a better chance of keeping their minds sharp for as long as possible. Plus, they are less likely to have episodes of hyper or hypoglycemia. Such episodes could do more than just jeopardize their thinking further. They could lead to unconsciousness, increased falls risk and other complications.

Having in-home caregivers present could keep diabetics and dementia patients safe during hypo and hyperglycemicevents. For instance, they could offer patients a glass of juice or other simple carbohydrates to bring their glucose levels back to normal during hyperglycemic events. Conversely, they could help patients with a history of hypoglycemia by monitoring their food intake. This includes preparing menu items like thickened liquids and pureed foods.

In addition, people with both illnesses often become incontinent. Those with dementia may be unable to care for themselves after accidents, which could lead to skin breakdown and infections. In-home caregivers could lower that risk by cleaning dementia patients’ skin after accidents and helping them put on fresh clothes. To learn more about how diabetes and dementia care may be given simultaneously, please contact Endeavor Senior Care.

3 Simple Ways to Support a Dementia Caregiver

dementia caregiver

Caregiving provided by a loving person can make a huge difference in the person’s life, but the process of caring for someone suffering from dementia can also become all-consuming.

When a person is caring for someone with dementia, the journey can be extremely emotional, stressful and long. It is made even more difficult because there is currently no cure for dementia and very few medical treatments are helpful. Fortunately, caregiving that is provided by a loving person can make a huge difference in the person’s life, but the process of caring for this person can also become all-consuming.

Because of the struggles involved, a caregiver for a dementia patient needs quite a bit of support from those around them. Knowing that there are people who can be relied on will help make the journey much easier. Here are three simple ways to offer support to a dementia caregiver.

Complete Simple Tasks

When providing dementia care even simple tasks, like picking up groceries, can be a challenge. In order to support a caregiver, an outsider can easily complete errands and other simple tasks around the home.

Offer an Outlet

Sometimes a caregiver simply needs a shoulder to lean on when they are struggling. Offering comfort in these times is one of the best ways that a person can help a dementia caregiver. Friends can help give the caregiver time away from their struggles so that they can relax and unwind.

Care for the Medical Needs

Sometimes the dementia patient isn’t the only person who requires medical attention. Plus, it is easy for the caregiver to ignore issues with their own health when they are caring for someone with dementia. In order to support a caregiver, watch for signs that they require medical attention themselves. It is also helpful to ensure that the caregiver is taking care of their health by eating properly and receiving medical assessments.

Although being a dementia caregiver can be a struggle, there are many ways that others can make the journey a little easier. To learn more about how to care for a dementia caregiver, be sure to contact us today.

Early Warning Signs that in Home Care is Needed

There is nothing easy about watching our loved ones grow old. They are the ones that we have always turned to in a time of need, but now the roles are reversed and they find themselves leaning more on others. Becoming the caregiver to someone who has always given back to you can be difficult. One of the most important things that you can do when in this situation is to look for early warning signs that in home care is needed.

in home care

It’s time to consider in home care if your loved one is showing symptoms of Alzheimer’s or dementia.

One early sign that a loved one may need homecare is related to their memory. While it is common for people to repeat themselves on occasion, you should definitely note if your loved one does so more than normal. This could be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease or dementia or could even be the sign that a stroke has occurred.

Another sign that you should look for is your loved one forgetting common things and misplacing things. Keep in mind that it is not abnormal to forget or misplace something, but putting things like a purse or a pair of shoes in the refrigeratormay be a sign that something more serious is going on.

Other more subtle issues may be reason for concern as well. For example, dramatic mood changes or sudden decreases in interests, appetite or energy may also be a sign that homecare is needed. While these problems can appear in anyone, they often point to more serious health concerns in the elderly.

If you notice any of these changes in your loved one, you may be surprised to find that this could be an indication thathomecare is needed. For best results, consult your loved one’s regular doctor privately about their specific needs. In order to learn more about the signs that indicate that your loved one may need homecare, please contact us.

Home Healthcare Solutions Exist for People with PTSD Dementia

Have you ever experienced trauma in your life? According to the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder’s ongoing research, almost all of us have gone through such events. Unfortunately, a May 2015 article that appeared in The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry indicates having those types of experiences puts us at risk of developing something many families don’t anticipate.

home healthcare

There are treatment options for PTSD dementia patients, and we can help your family find the right one.

If you guessed dementia, you’d be correct. On a good note, the National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder also believes that people suffering from one or both illnesses would benefit from home healthcare. It is one item on a list of treatment options the center released previously to interested caregivers. A registered nurse or physician can go over, in detail, the other items on the list for families that are interested.

Based on those published treatment recommendations, it’s apparent that the agency’s experts widely believe that everything from medically necessary assistance to companion care services may help. So families should know that it is normal to see both types of care included on a PTSD dementia patient’s care plan.

There are a number of ways to pay for home healthcare for PTSD dementia patients. As such, specialized care plans and related treatments are in reach for those that need it. For example, treatment for trauma experienced as part of service to our country may be covered by Veterans Administration programs and private insurance. Our team members are willing to sit down and offer guidance to families in need of PTSD dementia in-home care.

To learn more about obtaining care for people with PTSD related dementia and receive personalized assistance, pleasecontact us at Endeavor Senior Care. We specialize in caring for people with various forms of dementia, including post-traumatic, LBD, Alzheimer’s and TBI. All of our caregivers are screened. Plus, we’re bonded and insured.

Terry Pratchett Gives Dementia Care a Patient’s Face

The recent passing of Sir Terry Pratchett offers a rare view of dementia care, a view from the patient’s perspective. If you don’t know Sir Terry, he wrote fantasy and science fiction, publishing more than 70 books. He is best known for his whimsical Discworld series, which includes some 40 volumes set in “a flat world perched on the backs of four elephants which, in turn, stand on the back of a giant turtle.” His obituary from the BBC recounts the details of a remarkable life.

dementia care

Terry Prachett wrote poignantly about the effects of dementia.

It is another of his works that provides his unique view of dementia. You see, Sir Terry suffered from posterior cortical atrophy, a rare variant of Alzheimer’s disease which affects vision. He was diagnosed in 2008 and put his fame behind a push for more research. In 2013, he was asked to provide the inaugural entry to Alzheimer’s Research UK’s dementia blog, which is dedicated to telling the stories in dementia patients. He wrote:

“There isn’t one kind of dementia. There aren’t a dozen kinds. There are hundreds of thousands. Each person who lives with one of these diseases will be affected in uniquely destructive ways. . . . Dementia attacks those facets which make us who we are, and it’s a deeply personal attack that defies prediction.”

Sir Terry wrote about the fear the dementia inspires in all of us. “Dementia vies with cancer in an unsavoury battle of the scariest, but it must be said that some lucky people will survive cancer.” That fear infects not only the patients, but their family and friends as well. Those loved ones are the foundation of what he calls “a trained and compassionate care system” which includes family and caregivers working together.

If your loved one has dementia, selecting a caregiver is one of the most important decisions that you will make. Contact us to help you find someone with the training and compassion that your loved one needs.

Memory Care You can Use to Connect with Your Loved One

memory care

Enjoying activities like painting, drawing, and playing music, can help strengthen memory.

When an older family member struggles with memory loss and dementia, we often lose the ability to communicate with them in a way that is satisfying to both of us. Although there is a caregiver in the home so we don’t worry about their safety or health, and we know that trained aides use memory care techniques to sustain our loved one’s cognitive abilities, we want to do something ourselves to hang onto the bond we have with our loved ones.

Trained workers use Reality Orientation, Fantasy Validation, Music and Art Therapy with other techniques to connect with elderly clients, but there are some things you can do too, using the same principles, to maintain the bond with your elderly family member. Playing music, making art and cooking together are all great ways to connect with loved ones who are limited in their communication. Besides that benefit, studies show that these therapies can reduce pain and discomfort in the elderly.

When you play songs from their youth, you stimulate memories that can foster your loved one’s ability to connect with you. They often reminisce, and you may even learn something about your past from engaging them at that level. Research also shows that the mind uses organization tasks to process the music and that can help people reinforce cognitive abilities. When you introduce rhythm and respond to it by moving or dancing with your loved one, you further tap into that organizational element.

Drawing, painting or coloring with an impaired elderly person enables connection by accessing emotions and pleasure areas that the person has trouble verbalizing. When language begins to slip away, emotions are still strong; drawing, using color and texture can activate those emotions and the memories that rise with them.

Even cooking with your loved one is a powerful tool. Food, in its preparation and in the eating of it, is so important to family life and to who we are as individuals( especially women). Simple recipes like scrambled eggs, cakes and cookies, even making a peanut butter sandwich together, can bring back those emotional memories of family that connect us to our loved ones.

For more information on how to enrich your loved one’s life, or to find out how a live-in aide can give you peace of mind,contact us. Together,as a team, we can keep your family ties stronger, longer.

Does Your Loved One’s Dementia Care Take Scientific Research into Account?

In February 2015, The American Journal of Psychiatry presented review results that in the future, may just make diabetes management a part of dementia care. The article titled, “Modifiable Predictors of Dementia in Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis”, highlighted an unmistakable connection between the two health problems. It also provided suggestions on what should be done about it. Currently on the researchers’ table are recommendations to adjust at-risk seniors’ diets and improve chronic disease management on all fronts. Early screening for MCI and other mental health conditions is also being suggested by some members of the medical community.

dementia care

We take ongoing dementia and Alzheimer’s research very seriously, and incorporate new findings into our practices.

At Endeavor Senior Care of Scottsdale, we take ongoing Alzheimer’s disease research seriously. Consequently, we pride ourselves on informing Arizona’s families of any advancements that may help improve the lives of their loved ones. Our caregivers are trained to utilize a proven dementia care management system known as AlzBetter® and details about the program may be found here. In addition, registered nurses and occupational therapists are essential parts of our home care team.

Our registered nurses can help dementia care patients manage their diabetes medications. They can also work with other medical professionals to ensure that patients’ comorbidities don’t unnecessarily contribute to dementia driven, cognitive decline. Nutritional care plans that address patients’ increased folate needs and provide other interventions that may enrich their quality of life can be formulated as well. Why?

We let the unique, personal needs of our dementia care patients and their families take precedence. So no matter what advancements in dementia home care come down the pike, we’re poised to help Arizona’s families live better lives. To learn more about Endeavor Senior Care’s dementia care program and what our staff can do to help families now, please contact us. Our corporate office is in Scottsdale but we serve locations throughout the Phoenix Valley. The list includes, but isn’t limited to Fountain Hills, Mesa, Phoenix, Tucson, Sun City and Paradise Valley.

Memory Care can Slow Memory Loss in the Elderly

We all experience some degree of memory impairment as we age. While it affects everyone differently and at a different stage of aging, it is estimated that after late middle age we lose one percent of our brain cells every year. For many, it is as simple as forgetting where the car keys are or not being able to recall someone’s name in a conversation. For others, though, memory loss is a more serious matter. Our loved ones can forget to take medications, for example, or forget that they have already taken them and double-dose.

memory care

Doing mentally challenging activities like crossword puzzles has been shown to slow memory loss.

Because memory loss is one characteristic of Alzheimer’s or dementia, not being able to remember things can be terrifying to an elderly person who desperately wants to maintain the independence of living at home. Some researchers believe that the loss of daily work and physical activity takes away the meaningful structure around which we anchor data. Others think older people have so much more data stored in their memories that it is just more difficult to access.

No matter what the cause turns out to be, we know that there are steps we can take to exercise the brain and prevent or slow memory loss. One of these steps involves physical activity such as walking or targeted exercise. Another thing that may help stave off memory loss is regular reading and, in addition, discussing the book or article. Playing board games is helpful too, because it encourages critical thinking skills. Doing crossword puzzles and other mentally challenging activitiescan be effective; recent studies seemed to show that doing the crossword in the New York Times four times a week reduced the risk of developing Alzheimer’s by 50% over those who did the puzzle only once weekly.

That is encouraging. Just the presence of someone in the home offering companionship and challenging your loved one to exercise the body and the brain can make a difference. That is why we offer memory care as a component of our in-home care for the elderly. Our trained staff can be the “nudge” your loved one needs to slow or prevent additional memory loss.

For more information on how we can help your loved one stay happier and healthier longer, contact us.

Alzheimer’s care: Benefits of At-Home Care

А diagnosis оf Alzheimer’s disease саn devastate аnу family аnd саusе а major upheaval оf thе family dynamic. Ноwеvеr, mоrе families today аrе opting for Alzheimer’s care fоr thеіr loved оnеs аt hоmе аs long аs роssіblе іn order tо offer thе individual diagnosed wіth thе disease, аs well аs оthеr family members, wіth а number оf benefits. Іn order tо mаkе decisions rеgаrdіng care аnd financial concerns оr long-term care options dоwn thе lіnе, family members аnd care providers shоuld recognize sоmе оf thе benefits оf providing home-based care fоr а loved one.

Benefits of At-Home Care - mesa live in careProximity То Yоur Family

One оf thе greatest benefits оf caring fоr а loved оnе diagnosed wіth Alzheimer’s аt hоmе іs thе opportunity tо continue tо enjoy thаt person’s company fоr аs long аs роssіblе, іn а familiar аnd comforting environment. Сеrtаіn changes, suсh аs adapting thе hоmе fоr sоmеоnе wіth Alzheimer’s, will nееd tо bе considered, but caregivers, whеthеr family members оr professionals, knоw thаt familiar surroundings help tо decrease anxiety аnd stress fоr Alzheimer’s patients, whісh helps tо kеер thеm calm.

Comfort Аt Home

Many spouses, adult children оr оthеr family members аrе uncomfortable аbоut making thе decision оn whеthеr оr nоt tо place Mom/Dad or Grandma/Grandpa оr оthеr relative іntо а nursing hоmе оr long-term care facility. Fоr thоsе whо choose tо kеер thеіr loved оnе аt hоmе, а comfortable аnd familiar environment саn bе maintained. Тhе sаmе bed, а favorite chair, а familiar room аll help thе person wіth Alzheimer’s continue tо feel, аt lеаst fоr а time, thаt hе оr shе іs іn familiar territory. Comfort аnd safety аrе major concerns fоr аnуоnе tаkіng care оf а person wіth Alzheimer’s, sо thе ability tо provide suсh comforting surrounding tо а loved оnе offers а great sense оf security tо them.

Overseeing Care

It’s hard tо knоw іf Mom оr Dad іs bеіng tаkеn care оf properly іf thеу аrе іn а nursing hоmе оr long-term care center. Оnе оf thе greatest benefits оf providing hоmе care fоr а person diagnosed wіth Alzheimer’s іs thе opportunity аnd ability tо oversee hіs оr hеr care оn а daily basis. Making surе thе patient іs properly dressed, bathed аnd hаs nееds met аrе great sources оf comfort fоr loved ones.

A Sustained Quality оf Life

Quality оf life issues аrе аt thе forefront оf mаnу concerns rеgаrdіng Alzheimer’s care іn thе hоmе. Ноwеvеr, home-bound Alzheimer’s patients stіll hаvе а greater degree оf independence аnd mobility thаn thоsе secured іn Alzheimer’s units іn nursing homes аnd long-term care centers. Wіth supervision, аn Alzheimer’s patient cared fоr аt hоmе mау stіll enjoy familiar surroundings, family interaction аnd stimulus frоm everyday household activities.

Contact us to learn more about our Mesa live in care providers and the benefits of at-home care for those with Alzheimer’s.