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When You Just Can’t Be There, Consider Respite Care

respite care

Respite care can provide peace of mind to a primary caregiver.

Everyone needs a little help now and then, and that goes for caregivers as well as those they care for. While being a primary caregiver is born out of limitless love, an individual’s personal resources aren’t. In order to take care of loved ones, caregivers need to take care of themselves. Nevertheless, whether it is to deal with physical, financial, or emotional needs, the caregiver naturally wants assurances that the people they love are in good hands when they are not able to be there. Respite care might be the answer to those concerns.

Some primary caregivers seek respite care in the form of a companion who will stay with a dependent loved one for few hours while they run errands. Others find a personal care aide a godsend in to help with activities of daily living such as bathing. Many find adult daycare to be a good alternative so that they can continue to work. Still others require care for their loved one overnight so they can get a good night’s sleep. Whatever the particular need, respite care can be an answer to a prayer and give the caregiver peace of mind.

If you and your loved one are residents of the Phoenix, Mesa, Paradise Valley, Sun City, Gilbert, Tucson, or Scottsdale areas, contact us so we can discuss what options are available to assist you. You’ve made the selfless decision that allows your loved one to stay at home, but you don’t have to do it alone. We can help.

Alzheimer’s Disease Third Stage and Homecare Services

homecare servicesAlzheimer’s Disease typically progresses through stages with Stage Three being the last and most severe one. This final period lasts anywhere from one to three years and is quite trying for everyone involved with your loved one’s care. Because of the difficulty, it is often advised to utilize homecare services for additional support.

You can help your loved one by knowing the symptoms to look for and then doing what you can to help.

  • Loss of communication—Your loved one will likely begin to lose their ability to speak. As you help him or her through their daily activities, talk with them about what you are doing as if they had the ability to respond.
  • Excessive movement—Offer activities that allow them to move in meaningful ways. Give your loved one soft material to rub, a doll to rock, or task them with wiping tables.
  • Loss of normal movement—Help them with lifting their arms and bending elbows or other movements that seem to be difficult.
  • Loss of desire to eat—Offer meal replacement drinks with as much nutrition as possible. Also, feed them fresh fruit, ice cream, or other foods they enjoy.
  • Choking—If your loved one begins having trouble swallowing, talk with their doctor or the pharmacist. Thickening agents are available and they make drinks easier to swallow. You can also offer foods that are easy to swallow such as mashed potatoes.
  • Lack of emotion—Sing songs that are familiar and look for any eye movement. Touch them frequently by brushing their hair or rubbing lotion on their arms and hands.
  • Seizures—Talk with your loved one’s doctor and they may prescribe anti-seizure medication.
  • More susceptible to infection and illness—Ask any visitors who may have a fever or cold to postpone visiting until they are well. You can also assure proper hand washing techniques and use anti-bacterial wipes on faucets, doorknobs, counter tops, and other areas that are touched often.

While there are typical patterns with Alzheimer’s Disease, it progresses differently in each person. For more information on this condition or abut how we can help, please contact us.