Posts

In-Home Care Professionals

fkldsjflsdalfsdjlfsdjlkfjsdljflksd fsd f sadljkf sd jlfsdjkl fsdljk fjkl safjkl sda

 

Heading 2

image-facebookjlfjsakfjsdajfsdajfsdjfklsdjflsdjfsj f j kfsdjkfsjdkjk fsjd  jfsdjfsdajkljfdsj ljlksdkljflksdj fsd

 

Heading 3

jklfdsjfjsdlkfjlsdk fsjd  jfsdjkjf kende kfsdjkl.sf lsjdkjflsdjflsd .fs.djjf sdajlk

 

Heading 4

Three Tips for a Smooth Transition to Home Health Care

It’s a common issue for many families. Busy sandwich generation caregivers being pulled in a million directions as aging parents struggle with the gradual loss of independence.

You begin to notice things slipping around your mother’s house, but even the most subtle mention of bringing in help yields harsh opposition. Mom just isn’t ready to welcome a stranger into her home with open arms; however, you are no longer able to handle everything.

Here are three tips for beginning the transition to home health care.

home health care

Consulting with a geriatric care manager may be a helpful step in the transition to home health care.

  • Bring in a housekeeper for just a few hours each week. Let your loved one share in defining responsibilities; he or she is more apt to accept help with household chores than personal care. Allowing time for a relationship to form will make adding additional services less traumatic.
  • Be honest. Tell your loved one you’re struggling with everything you have on your plate. Explain how much you worry and that it would help alleviate your concerns to know someone was coming in to help with medication and meal preparation while you are working. Including them in the interview and selection process will increase their comfort level.
  • If all else fails, consult with a geriatric care manager for tips on how best to handle your specific situation. A trained professional will evaluate your loved one and help design and introduce a suitable care plan.

Home health care is a great way relieve some of the pressure you, the primary caregiver, are feeling. Contact us to learn more about our services. We look forward to providing personalized, compassionate care that will give you peace of mind and allow your loved one to remain independent for as long as possible.

Senior Care Services: No Guilt Trip

Did you know that one in five Americans is a caregiver? It’s true; twenty percent of us care for an elderly or disabled person at home. We try to be super-human and balance our jobs and family with caregiving duties, but that seldom works. Caregivers burn out. They get frustrated and angry, they have more sick days and they are exhausted. Added to that, most caregivers of people 65 or older are in their 60s themselves. That means they may be dealing with some age-related arthritis or other health issues themselves.

senior care services

An in-home caregiver can provide socialization for your loved one, while protecting you from caregiver burnout.

If you are one of the twenty percent, you may have considered arranging for senior care services but you feel guilty at the prospect of hiring someone to help. You feel justified in having someone administer medications or lift your loved one for baths, but the idea of someone who will come and “just sit” makes you uneasy. After all, you are there and you can visit with your loved one, you can do dishes and vacuum, you can give massages and treat wounds.You can give adequate care without the added expense of in-home senior services.

Well, first, in-home caregivers seldom “just sit.” They read to the patient to keep them alert or they visit to give them socialization. Beyond that, the service caregivers can help with light housekeeping. That is where the guilt often surfaces. After all, if you are there, why let someone else do the work…and why pay to have it done?

The answer is simple: it will keep you from burnout and the associated illnesses it brings. Seventy-five percent of family caregivers are women, and women need more socialization. In short, you need to get out from time to time. In addition, the service doesn’t provide all the care. You do a lot. You are the “first responder” in the morning and the one who answers the call at two a.m. You are more likely to be obese than the general population. Wounds heal slower and you get depressed easier. Added to this, the resentment you may feel from being “boxed in” by your caregiving duties can lead to an unhealthy relationship with your loved one.

Insurance companies don’t usually cover custodial help. Still, the expense might be just as justifiable as a routine medical exam or a gym membership. It is preventative treatment. The cost may be less than treating burn-out related illness. If you are the one-in-five, that is something to consider.

If you would like to know more about in-home senior care, contact us. Let us show you how, instead of a “guilty pleasure,” it might just be a “stitch-in-time.”

Providing Care at Home Can Be Fun

Something as simple as fun is the easiest way to change people’s behavior for the better. Be it for yourself, for the environment or for something entirely different. The only thing that matters is that it’s change for the better.

care at home

Caring for a senior is certainly hard work, but that shouldn’t prevent you both from having fun, too.

This quote is from Thefuntheory.com website and applies to everyone.

No one ever makes reference to the daily care at home given to the elderly as “fun”. As we all agree, work is not fun but making work “fun” is possible.

When a professional in-home care provider arrives, there is usually a set of duties planned to get completed during that shift. No time for fun here, or is there?

As a family member providing home care for your loved one, you wear your no-nonsense hat to work. But does that mean no fun allowed?

Making duties a little more interesting and fun will benefit both you and the person needing the care. You’ve heard the saying “Time flies when you’re having fun”. You can put that to the test.

You may have an uncooperative recipient of your services and fun might just bring them around. A smile, a chuckle or a full roar of laughter can change the environment you work in and your client lives in. Yes, it may take a few extra minutes but it will be a benefit.

Here are a few suggestions to get you started:

Bathing

  • Lay out 4 towels and 4 matching washcloths of different colors on the bed. Pick a color and let your client find that color and the matching washcloth. That will be your color for the day.
  • Place a few hairbrushes and combs in a container short enough for them to stand on end and be visible. Have your client pick out either all the combs or brushes.
  • Keep 3 or 4 toothbrushes in the holder. Let the client pick out the color of the day or their favorite color. Give them a cup to spittle in over the sink and laugh when they miss.

Dressing

  • Lay out a few pairs of socks and unmatch them. Let your client find a matching pair or finish matching them all if they want.
  • Lay out a short-sleeved and long-sleeved shirt and ask your client to decide which is best for the weather outside.
  • Lay out men and women’s undergarments. Hand them the opposite sex item and laugh.

As the care provider, it rests on your shoulders to set the mood for you and your client. All your clients, including those with mild dementia can benefit from these exercises helping to stimulate the mind and muscles.

Here at Endeavor Home Care in the Phoenix area, we provide professional, friendly caregivers that can bring a smile to your loved one’s face. Contact us to help place the right caregiver with your family.